Uncommon Wisdom: Old Testament Wisdom Books

Introduction Overall, Old Testament (OT) wisdom books are fairly anthropocentric (man-centered) since they address the issues of everyday living faced by God’s people. That does not mean that they are not also theocentric (God-centered). God instructs His people to live their lives in view of His existence, presence, righteousness, and justice. Studying these books provides …

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Daniel 8–Focus on a Key Individual

Daniel 7 repeats the same series of six kingdoms as Daniel 2, but uses different figures to represent them. However, Daniel 8 focuses only on the 3rd through the 6th of those kingdoms. Daniel’s prophetic revelation highlights Antiochus Epiphanes as the historico-prophetic springboard. The prophecies pertaining to Antiochus Epiphanes act as an introduction to the …

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The Synoptic Gospels’ Inerrancy: Entering or Leaving Jericho?

Earlier we discussed whether Jesus healed one man or two men on His journey between Jericho and Jerusalem (Matthew 20:29–34; Mark 10:46–52; Luke 18:35–43). At least one additional problem presents itself in these three passages. Luke 18:35 says that Jesus was approaching (or, entering) Jericho. But Mark 10:46 says, “as He was leaving Jericho,” and …

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The Synoptic Gospels’ Inerrancy: What Did Peter Say?

The synoptic Gospels seem to put different words into Peter’s mouth when he makes his statement regarding the identity of Jesus. Compare the following: Matthew 16:16, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Mark 8:29, “You are the Christ.” Luke 9:20, “The Christ of God.” In our thinking the event was so …

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The Synoptic Gospels’ Inerrancy: How Many Walking Sticks?

In ancient Israel people often used the Persian reed (Arundo donax—a tall reed growing up to eighteen feet or more high; also known as giant cane) for a walking stick. Other uses for this reed included fishing rods, measuring rods, and musical pipes.[1] Some individuals may have chosen a wooden stick (a staff) for greater stability …

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The Synoptic Gospels’ Inerrancy: How Many People?

Let’s return to the synoptic Gospels’ reporting of the healing of the demon-possessed men (or man?) from Gadara (Matthew 8:28–34; Mark 5:1–20; Luke 8:26–39). We dealt with the apparent geographical contradiction in our first post. At least one more problem exists when we compare these passages. According to Matthew, two demon-possessed men approached Jesus. However, …

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The Synoptic Gospels’ Inerrancy: Misrepresentation of Persons

Matthew 8:5–13 reports the miracle of Jesus healing a Roman centurion’s servant. Matthew seems to say the centurion himself approached Jesus with the request. Luke 7:1–10, however, speaks only of some Jewish leaders coming to Jesus with the centurion’s request. Is there a mistake in one of these two Gospel accounts? A possible answer to …

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