My Recommendations: Book of the Week, May 15

Christ Alone: The Uniqueness of the Gospel and Its Impact on the World (Xulon Press, 2017) collects seventeen essays together in one volume. The authors (more than 20 of them–many who sat in my classes at The Master’s Seminary) serve as faculty in The Master’s Academy International in South Africa, Italy, India, Ukraine, Czech Republic, Spain, Mexico, Singapore, China, Albania, Croatia, the Philippines, Honduras, Germany, Switzerland, and Russia, as well as for Russian speaking and Spanish speaking ministries in the United States. Mark Tatlock, the volume’s general editor, describes the volume’s aim: it “addresses aberrations within the teaching of major world religions and within the contemporary evangelical church as to the person and work of Christ” (p. xii). The essays present case studies of Christological and soteriological threats resulting from a non-biblical worldview that impact the respective regions where the authors serve. Any Christian falling within the following groups ought to read this volume and rededicate their lives to the ministry of the gospel: missionaries (both serving and potentially going to serve), church pastors, church elders, missions committee members, students in Bible colleges and seminaries, and lay people desiring to pray and to give more wisely to missions.

This comprises the second volume in the series Global Implications of Biblical Doctrine.

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Why is Bible translation an important missions ministry?

Churches and individuals too often neglect Bible translation as a missions ministry. After all, that’s something for the experts and for organizations like Wycliffe Bible Translators to handle, right? However, as long as churches remain committed to missionary evangelism and church planting they will need the Bible. Try doing missions ministries (spiritual ministries, not going to dig a well or to build a bungalow or to outfit a camp) without a Bible. From where do you get the gospel message?–the local newspaper? What will a new believer read in order to grow spiritually?–the Bible in a language different than his own? Where does a new church find its purpose, its guidance, its teaching, and its beliefs?

As a contributor to ParkingSpace23’s blog, I recently posted an article on Bible translation and missions ministries. I hope you will click on the following link Why is Bible translation an important missions ministry?, read, and begin to do something to keep Bible translation prominent in your own life and giving as well as in the corporate purpose of your local church.

My Recommendations: Book of the Week, April 17

The ministry of Bible translation has occupied a good portion of my own life and ministry. My shelf is filled with books about Bible translation and Bible versions, as well as Bibles in many languages. I first heard Dave Brunn speak about his book in a session he conducted at the national meetings of the Evangelical Theological Society. We immediately found many viewpoints in common. His book, One Bible, Many Versions: Are All Translations Created Equal? (IVP Academic, 2013) provides a fresh and winsomely written look at the complementary nature of different translational methodologies and their representative English translations. At the same time, Dave Brunn reveals a lot of valuable information about translating the Bible into other languages–his own experience was among the Lamogai of Papua New Guinea. Brunn is director of education for the New Tribes Mission Missionary Training Center.

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