Hebrew Whiteboard Update

Psalm 5:4-6 (Hebrew verse numbering) starts off with David’s second direct address to Yahweh. The double reference to “morning” follows to identify the time of David’s prayer–thus the attribution of a morning prayer for this psalm traditionally. The psalmist’s focus is on God Himself, the kind of God He is, and what that means for mankind generally and David specifically. One of the significant studies in these verses will involve our analysis of Hebrew words (and phrases) for identifying wicked people–those whose character opposes the character of God. In these verses the Masoretic accents play a special role at key points in the text by clarifying the emphases.

Click on Hebrew Whiteboard to download Psalm 5:1-6 or any of the previous studies of Psalms 1-4 and 120-122.

Hebrew Whiteboard Update

Psalm 5:1-3 (Hebrew verse numbering) like Psalm 3, speaks of David praying in the morning (Psalm 4 is an evening prayer, before he lies down to sleep). Foes still surround him and challenge his governing and his faith. But, through it all David turns to God. This psalm opens with a focus on Yahweh, David’s King and David’s God. David wrote Psalm 4 to be accompanied by flutes, wind instruments; however, he wrote Psalm 5 to be accompanied by stringed instruments–the evening flutes vs. the morning strings.

Click on Hebrew Whiteboard to download Psalm 5:1-3 or any of the previous studies of Psalms 1-4 and 120-122.

Hebrew Whiteboard Update

With this post we complete the analysis of Psalm 4. David penned this psalm from the depths of his own stressful experience facing people who opposed him. No one knows the exact circumstances. A mention of “grain and sweet wine” after his opponents had asked, “Who will show us good?” might indicate that it was a time of famine. David responded to pressure with prayer and to wicked people with a command to repent. Multiple chiasms highlight the structure of the psalm and emphasize key concepts. Repetitions help to tie the psalm together in one unified song. This very personal psalm focuses on God, without whom David would have no peace or security and without whom the ungodly have no hope.

Click on Hebrew Whiteboard to download Psalm 4 or any of the previous studies of Psalms 1-3 and 120-122.

Hebrew Whiteboard Update

Psalm 4:8-9 (Hebrew verse numbering for the English vv. 7-8) bring us to the end of the body of this Davidic psalm. These two verses display a good deal of emphasis by means of literary devices, grammatical structure, and vocabulary. Thus, the psalm ends with a burst of emotion and truths that seal its message on the hearts of David’s hearers and readers.

Watch for the final installment in our analysis of Psalm 4 in which we will examine the musical subscription, identify the psalm’s structure, provide a summary of exegetical and theological comments, and suggest homiletical propositions.

Click on Hebrew Whiteboard to download Psalm 4:1-9 or any of the previous studies of Psalms 1-3 and 120-122.

Hebrew Whiteboard Update

Now we come to Psalm 4:6-7 (Hebrew verse numbering) as we continue to analyze this psalm. After one imperative in verse 4 and four imperatives in verse 5, verse 6 adds two more, for a total of seven. In verse 7 we behold what Motyer calls “an arrow prayer,” similar to those that Nehemiah often prayed–instantaneous, extemporaneous prayers to God. Psalm 4 is one of David’s many prayers. We should learn to pray as he did.

Click on Hebrew Whiteboard to download Psalm 4:1-7 or any of the previous studies of Psalms 1-3 and 120-122.

Hebrew Whiteboard Update

Psalm 4:5 brings us to the second occurrence of “Selah” in this psalm and it gives the verse added emphasis. The verse also leads us to study the Septuagint (LXX) translation, since Paul cited the first half of the verse from the LXX in Ephesians 4:26. As we continue our analysis of Psalm 4, the structure exposed in vv. 2-5 will provide us with information necessary for both an accurate interpretation of the psalm and appropriate application of its theological implications.

Follow this link for Hebrew Whiteboard to download Psalm 4:1-5 or any of the previous studies of Psalms 1-3 and 120-122.